The Buckinghamshire Constabulary was formed in 1857, with a Headquarters based in Aylesbury.

The Constabulary covered the whole of the county of Buckinghamshire with the exceptions of the towns of Buckingham and High Wycombe which appointed their own police forces. Buckingham Borough police amalgamated into Buckinghamshire in 1889 and High Wycombe Borough police in 1947. Until 1974 the county of Buckingham included Slough, Langley and Eton. This area was then transferred into Berkshire in a local government reorganisation.

In 1889 the establishment of the force had gradually increased to 140 (one chief constable, five superintendents, five inspectors, 19 sergeants and 110 constables). The establishment continued to gradually increase in 1914 was 216.

On 4 August 1914, when war was declared a total of eight men, who had previous military service, were immediately recalled to the Colours. During the course of the war, a further 70 men volunteered to serve. Members of both the First and Second Police Reserves were called upon to cover the absence and to assist in the increase of workload brought about by the Defence of the Realm Act and Regulations.

Of the 78 men who served in the war, only 50 rejoined the Buckinghamshire Constabulary at the end of the war, three failed to rejoin due to being unfit as a result of injuries, and 15 men were killed in action or died from wounds.

The 15 men who died were:

Alfred William Haynes was born in Little Kimble, Buckinghamshire in 1889.

He was the youngest of four children of Alfred and Edith Haynes. His father was employed as an agricultural labourer. In the 1891 Census (Sunday 5 April 1891) the Haynes family were living in The Crown, Main Road, Great Kimble. By the 1901 Census the family had moved to The Post Office, Little Kimble where Edith was employed as the sub post mistress. Alfred was 11 years old and at school.

At the time of the 1911 Census (Sunday 2 April 1911) the family were still living in the post office at Little Kimble. Alfred was 21 years old and employed as a cowman.

On 15 January 1912 Alfred was appointed Police Constable 166 in the Buckinghamshire Constabulary. He was 22 years old, and prior to appointment had been employed as a labourer. After initial training in the Buckinghamshire Constabulary Headquarters in Aylesbury on 9 April 1912 he was posted to Slough on the Southern Division. On 26 November 1912 he was transferred to the Northern Division and posted to Bletchley.

Alfred remained at Bletchley until 5 December 1913 when he was posted internally to Wavendon. On 27 April 1914 he was again transferred, back to the Southern Division with a posting to Iver.

In 1914 military tension was rising in Europe. On 4 August Germany invaded Belgium as a means of accessing and invading France. Due to Germany’s refusal to retreat from the invasion Britain had no option but to declare war on Germany, and The Great War, later also to be referred to as World War One, commenced.

Like many young men Alfred volunteered for military service, and on 12 November 1915 he was released from the Buckinghamshire Constabulary under The Police (Emergency Provisions) Act 1915 and appointed as Trooper 1222 in the Household Battalion. This was an infantry Battalion that had been formed from reserves of the Household Cavalry Regiments.

While involved in fighting in the 1917 Trooper 1222 Alfred was wounded and on 7 October 1917 he died from his wounds. He was 25 years old. He is buried in grave reference I.E.4. in the Cement House Cemetery, Langemark, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Alfred John Huggins was born in Iver Heath, Buckinghamshire in 1892.

He was the eldest child of John and Margaret Huggins. His father was employed as a farm labourer. In the 1901 Census (Sunday 31 March 1901) the family were still in Iver Heath, as they were in the 1911 Census (Sunday 2 April 1911) and the address is listed as Chadwells Row, Iver Heath. John was still employed as a farm labour, and Alfred, 19 years old, was employed as a gardener.

On 24 April 1912 Alfred, aged 20, was appointed Police Constable 159 in the Buckinghamshire Constabulary. After initial training at the Buckinghamshire Constabulary Headquarters in Aylesbury on 28 August 1912 Alfred was posted to Bletchley on the Northern Division.

In 1914 military tension was rising in Europe. On 4 August Germany invaded Belgium as a means of accessing and invading France. Due to Germany’s refusal to retreat from the invasion Britain had no option but to declare war on Germany, and The Great War, later also to be referred to as World War One, commenced.

Like many young men Alfred volunteered for military service and on 3 July 1915 he was released from the Buckinghamshire Constabulary under the provisions of The Police (Emergency Provisions) Act 1915 and was appointed to 5th Battalion of the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry.

Between October and December 1916 Alfred, while on leave, married Lottie Burnell who lived in Fenny Stratford, who he obviously met as a result of his police service in Bletchley (registered Watford, Herts 1916 Oct-Dec Volume 3A Page 1656).

On 19 August 1917 Corporal 19092 Alfred Huggins of 5th Battalion, Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry died of wounds received while fighting in Belgium.

Alfred is remembered with honour and buried in grave reference I.D.4 in the Brandhoek New Military Cemetery No.3, Leper, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium. He is also commemorated on a grave headstone in Bletchley Cemetery. The grave is that of Private Frederick George Burnell, the brother of Alfred’s wife Lottie, who was killed in action in France on 6 November 1917.

Christopher Thomas Nichols was born in Moulsoe, Newport Pagnell, Buckinghamshire in 1890.

He was the youngest child of ten children born to Benjamin and Jane Nichols. At the time of his birth his father was a farm labour and 59 years old. His mother was 46 years old. In the 1891 Census (Sunday 5 April, 1891) the Nichols family were living in the village of Broughton, Buckinghamshire. Five of the children were still at home.

At the time of the 1901 Census (Sunday 31 March 1901) the Nichols family were still living in Broughton. Ben was 71 years old, and Christopher was 11 years old, and the only child remaining at home. However the family had been joined by Ernest Nichols, aged five, who was a grandson of Ben and Jane. Ben was still employed as a farm labourer.

On 17 November 1909, at the age of 19, Christopher was appointed Police Constable 79 in the Buckinghamshire Constabulary. On 3 March 1910 after initial training at the Buckinghamshire Constabulary Headquarters in Aylesbury, Christopher was posted to the Southern Division and stationed at Slough.

In the 1911 Census (Sunday 2 April 1911) Christopher is recorded as one of seven constables living in Slough Police Station. On 25 July 1912 he is posted within the Southern Division to Datchet.

On 11 February 1913 Christpher is commended by both the Maidenhead magistrates and his Chief Constable for the smartness he had displayed in arresting a person wanted for larceny, and for the able manner in which he had given his evidence, which led to the person being convicted and sentenced to four months hard labour.

In 1914 military tension was rising in Europe. On 4 August Germany invaded Belgium as a means of accessing and invading France. Due to Germany’s refusal to retreat from the invasion Britain had no option but to declare war on Germany, and The Great War, later also to be referred to as World War One, commenced.

Like many young men Christopher volunteered to serve in the military and on 12 November 1915 he was released by the Chief Constable of the Buckinghamshire Constabulary under the provisions of the Police (Emergency Provisions) Act 1915 for military service. He was initially appointed as Trooper 828 in the Household Brigade, but was later transferred to the Coldstream Guards.

On 24 March 1918 Private 22726 Christopher Nichols, aged 28, 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards was killed in action. He is remembered with honour and buried in grave reference VI. E. 4, in the Bucquoy Road Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France.

George Brandon was born in Watford, Hertfordshire in 1893, the second of nine children of Milford and Phoebe Brandon.

In the 1901 Census (Sunday 31 March 1901) the Brandon family, then with five children, were living in 40 Cecil Street, Watford.

Milford Brandon was employed as a general labourer. The family were still at the same address at the time of the 1911 Census (Sunday 2 April 1911), now with nine children. George was then 18 years old. No occupation is recorded on the Census.

In 1911 George enlisted in the Grenadier Guards and served for three years before being discharged in January 1914 and placed on Military Reserve.

On 2 February 1914 George was appointed Police Constable 207 in the Buckinghamshire Constabulary. After initial training in the Buckinghamshire Constabulary Headquarters in Aylesbury on 20 April 1914 he was posted to the Southern Division and stationed at Slough.

In 1914 military tension was rising in Europe. On 4 August Germany invaded Belgium as a means of accessing and invading France. Due to Germany’s refusal to retreat from the invasion Britain had no option but to declare war on Germany, and The Great War, later also to be referred to as World War One, commenced.

Due to his previous service in the Grenadier Guards and being on Military Reserve, George was immediately recalled to The Colours and rejoined the Grenadier Guards.

On 15 September, 1916 Lance Corporal 15036 George Brandon, aged 23, 2nd Battalion, Grenadier Guards, was killed in action in the Battle of Flers-Courcelette, part of the Somme Offensive. He has no known grave.

George is remembered with honour, under the name of John Brandon in the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Record. The reason for this mistake is not known but the service number 15036 is consistent with George Brandon on all other records. He is also recorded as John Brandon and remembered with honour on Pier 8, Face D, of the Thiepval Memorial to The Missing, in Picardy, France.

The Thiepval Memorial contains names of 72,191 missing British and South African men who died in the Somme Offensive between 1915 and 1918.

George Edward Long was born in Great Missenden, Buckinghamshire in 1895.

He was the eldest of six children of Edward and Minnie Long. Edward Long was a domestic gardener.

In the 1901 Census (Sunday 31 March 1901) the Long family were living in Little Kingshill, Great Missenden. In the 1911 Census (Sunday 2 April 1911) they are shown as living in Manchester House, Little Kingshill, Great Missenden. Edward is recorded as having been a general gardener, as is George, who was 16 years old.

In 1914 military tension was rising in Europe. On 4 August Germany invaded Belgium as a means of accessing and invading France. Due to Germany’s refusal to retreat from the invasion Britain had no option but to declare war on Germany, and The Great War, later also to be referred to as World War One, commenced.

On 26 August 1914 George was appointed Police Constable 47 in the Buckinghamshire Constabulary. George remained posted to the Buckinghamshire Constabulary headquarters for the period of his training, and was still there, when like many young men, he volunteered for military service. On 28 May 1915 he was allowed to resign from the Buckinghamshire Constabulary when he was enlisted into the 11th Battalion of the Queen’s (Royal West Surrey Regiment).

On 28 July 1918 Corporal 207992 George Long, 11th Battalion The Queen’s (Royal West Surrey Regiment) was killed in action while fighting on the Western Front. He was 23 years old. He is buried and remembered with honour in grave reference XXVIII. G. 19 in the Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, West-Vlaanderen, Belgium.

Herbert Tring Sapsed was born in Wooburn, Buckinghamshire in 1889.

He was the eldest of eight children of William and Florence Sapsed. His middle name of Tring was his mother’s maiden name. In the 1891 Census (Sunday 5 April 1891) William and Florence were living, with Herbert, in Berghers Hill, Wooburn. William was employed as a coachman.

In the 1901 Census (Sunday 31 March 1901) the Sapsed family, now with six children, were living in Wooburn Green, Buckinghamshire. William was still employed as a coachman. The family had not moved by the 1911 Census (Sunday 2 April 1911) although Herbert had left home and was living in Wooburn House, Wooburn, where he was employed as a second footman, in the household of Alfred Gilbey. This was a country house. Albert, a director of W and A Gilbey Ltd, had a family of five children, and 12 live-in servants.

On 10 August 1914 Herbert, aged 25, was appointed Police Constable 182 in the Buckinghamshire Constabulary.

In 1914 military tension was rising in Europe. On 4 August Germany invaded Belgium as a means of accessing and invading France. Due to Germany’s refusal to retreat from the invasion Britain had no option but to declare war on Germany, and The Great War, later also to be referred to as World War One, commenced.

After initial training in the Buckinghamshire Constabulary Headquarters in Aylesbury on 8 September 1914 Herbert was posted to the Southern Division and stationed at Slough.

Like many young men at the time, Herbert volunteered for military service, and on 27 July 1915 he was released by the Chief Constable of Buckinghamshire, under the provisions of The Police (Emergency Provisions) Act 1915, and joined the Royal Naval Air Service.

In 1917 The Royal Naval Air Service, together with the Royal Flying Corps, were merged and became The Royal Air Force. In the Royal Naval Air Service Herbert was a Leading Mechanic and on 1 August 1917 he was appointed a Corporal in the Discipline Branch of Royal Air Force.

Between January and March 1918 Herbert married Ethel Annie Kipping in London (recorded Marylebone 1918 Jan-Mar Volume 1A Page 1386).

On 20 June 1918 Herbert, aged 29, died as a result of wounds, in the in the Royal Naval Hospital at Haslar, Hampshire. He is buried, and remembered with honour in the church yard of All Saints, Leavesden, Hertfordshire.

Joseph Harold Beebee was born in Walsall, Staffordshire in 1886, one of four children of Joseph and Mary Beebee.

In the 1891 Census (Sunday 5 April 1891) the family were living in 6 Wisemore Villa, Hateley Lane, Walsall Foreign, Walsall, Staffordshire.

Joseph Beebee’s father died in 1896 and by the 1901 Census (Sunday 31 March 1901) Joseph was an inmate in the Walsall and West Bromwich School District, a school set up under a Poor Law Commissioners’ scheme. His mother; Mary was living as a boarder in 12 John Street, Walsall and working as a washer woman.

At some time prior to 1910 Joseph joined the Grenadier Guards, as by April 1910, at the age of 23, he had been released from service in the Grenadier Guards, and joined the Barrow-in-Furness Police Force as a Constable.

Between October and December 1910, Joseph married Eliza Coombes, in Hartley Wintney, Hampshire (registered Hartley Wintney 1910 Oct-Dec volume 2c page 487). It would appear that Joseph met Eliza while he was serving in the Grenadier Guards. Eliza was born in Yateley, Hampshire.

In the 1911 Census (Sunday 2 April, 1911) Joseph and Eliza were living in 40 Newby Terrace, Barrow-in-Furness, Lancashire and Joseph was a police constable in the local police force.

On 28 May 1914 Joseph resigned from the Barrow-in-Furness Police and on 1 June 1914 he was appointed police constable 114 in the Buckinghamshire Constabulary, and after initial training in the Buckinghamshire Constabulary Headquarters in Aylesbury on 6 July 1914 he was posted to the Eastern Division and stationed at Beaconsfield.

In 1914 military tension was rising in Europe. On 4 August Germany invaded Belgium as a means of accessing and invading France. Due to Germany’s refusal to retreat from the invasion Britain had no option but to declare war on Germany, and The Great War, later also to be referred to as World War One, commenced.

As a result of his previous military service Joseph was immediately recalled to the Colours and rejoined the 2nd Battalion, Grenadier Guards as Guardsman 13048.

On 15 August 1914 the 2nd Battalion Grenadier Guards formed part of the British Expeditionary Force and landed at Le Harve.

On 20 September 1914 in the Battle of Aisne Guardsman 13048 Joseph was killed in action. He has no known grave and is remembered with honour on the La Ferte-Sous-Jouarre Memorial, Seine-et-Marne, France.

Joseph Halsey was born in 1891 in Chorley Wood, Hertfordshire.

He was the youngest of seven children of Samuel and Charlotte Halsey. At the time of his birth, his father, Samuel was 60 years old, and was working as a Shoemaker. In the 1891 Census (Sunday 5 April 1891) the Halsey family were living in 25 Chorley Road, Rickmansworth, Hertfordshire.

In 1893, when Joseph was two years old, his father died. In the 1901 Census (Sunday 31 March 1901) Charlotte was living with her two youngest children, Samuel and Joseph, in Chorley Wood Bottom, Chorley Wood. Joseph was nine years old. In the 1911 Census (Sunday 2 April 1911) Charlotte is still in Chorley Wood Bottom, with her two sons: Samuel, aged 22, and Joseph, aged 19. Both are employed as railway porters on the Metropolitan Railway.

On 16 September 1912 Joseph Halsey was appointed Police Constable 192 in the Buckinghamshire Constabulary. After initial training in the Buckinghamshire Constabulary headquarters in Aylesbury, Joseph was posted to the South Division and stationed at Slough.

In 1914 military tension was rising in Europe. On 4 August Germany invaded Belgium as a means of accessing and invading France. Due to Germany’s refusal to retreat from the invasion Britain had no option but to declare war on Germany, and The Great War, later also to be referred to as World War One, commenced.

On 31 May 1915 Joseph was posted to the Central Division and stationed at Aylesbury.

Like many young men Joseph volunteered for military service and on 12 November 1915, he was released from the Buckinghamshire Constabulary under the Police (Emergency Provisions) Act 1915 to join the military.

On 15 November 1915 Joseph married Lucy Chilton in the Parish Church at Priestwood, Buckinghamshire (registered Wycombe 1915 Oct-Dec Volume 3A Page 2728). Research has indicated that Joseph, believing that he needed to be single to join the military, kept his marriage a secret from the authorities.

Joseph Halsey was appointed to the Military Mounted Police on 16 November, 1915 and initially stationed at Aldershot.

On 18 October 1916 Lucy gave birth to twin boys: Horace F and Joseph H Halsey (registered Wycombe 1916 Oct-Dec Volume 3A Page 1613).

Exact details of Joseph’s service with the Military Mounted Police are not known as the Military Mounted Police served, in various detachments, across all theatres of the war.

By 1919 Lance Corporal P/2661 was stationed in Hampstead. However, his medical condition was such that on 23 August 1919 he is discharged from the Military Mounted Police due to being medically unfit for further service. His address is given as Bryants Bottom, Great Missenden, Buckinghamshire. On 31 March 1920 Joseph died as a result of his medical condition, which was classed as a result of war service.

Joseph is remembered with honour and buried in Christ Church Churchyard, Chorley Wood, Hertfordshire.

Maurice Maunders was born in Dagnall, Bedfordshire, in 1899.

He was one of eight children of Mark and Lucy Maunders. His father was a farm labourer.

In the 1891 Census (Sunday 5 April 1891) the Maunders family were living in Studham Road, Edlesborough, Dagnall.

In 1896, Mark died. Maurice was six years old, and the second youngest of the eight children. Lucy was then a widow with eight children. The older children would have been working and supporting the Maunders family.

In the 1901 Census (Sunday 31 March 1891) the Maunders family were still in Studham Road, Ellesborough. Only three children remain at home, the eldest Mark, aged 22, was working as a cattleman on a farm. Maurice aged eleven, was still at school.

In 1906, at the age of 16, Maurice joined the Bedfordshire Regiment, and in the 1911 Census (Sunday 2 April 1911) he is shown as a member of H Company, 2nd Battalion, Bedfordshire Regiment stationed in Saint George, Bermuda.

On 12 March 1913 Maurice was discharged from the Bedfordshire Regiment after nearly seven years service, and placed on Military Reserve.

On 26 May 1913, at the age of 23, Maurice was appointed Police Constable 14 in the Buckinghamshire Constabulary. After initial training in the Buckinghamshire Constabulary headquarters in Aylesbury he was posted to the Northern Division and stationed at Brill.

In 1914 military tension was rising in Europe. On 4 August Germany invaded Belgium as a means of accessing and invading France. Due to Germany’s refusal to retreat from the invasion Britain had no option but to declare war on Germany, and The Great War, later also to be referred to as World War One, commenced.

As Maurice was on Reserve, for the Bedfordshire Regiment, he is recalled to The Colours on 4 August 1914 and rejoined the 1st Battalion, Bedfordshire Regiment.

The 1st Battalion of The Bedfordshire Regiment are immediately mobilised for war and land in France as part of the British Expeditionary Force on 16 August 1914 and immediately involved in action.

On 30 October 1914 Private 8483 Maurice Maunders, of 1st Battalion, Bedfordshire Regiment, was killed in action in the Battle of La Bassee (10 October to 2 November 1914). He has no known grave and is remembered with honour on panels 10 and 11 of the Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.

Raymond Rickard was born in 1895 in Wingrave, Buckinghamshire.

He was the youngest of eight children of John and Elizabeth Rickard. John was employed as a bricklayer.

In the 1901 Census (Sunday 31 March 1901) the Rickard family were living in Winslow Road, Wingrave, and were still in Wingrave in the 1911 Census (Sunday 2 April 1911). Raymond was employed as a farm labourer.

On 2 February 1914 Raymond was appointed Police Constable 208 in the Buckinghamshire Constabulary and following his initial training in the Buckinghamshire Police Headquarters at Aylesbury on 29 April 1914 he was posted to Buckingham.

In 1914 military tension was rising in Europe. On 4 August Germany invaded Belgium as a means of accessing and invading France. Due to Germany’s refusal to retreat from the invasion Britain had no option but to declare war on Germany, and The Great War, later also to be referred to as World War One, commenced.

On 1 September 1914 Raymond’s elder brother volunteered and joined the Motor Machine Gun Corps. It would appear that this encouraged Raymond to also volunteer as on 1 October 1914 he was appointed Guardsman 19524 in the Grenadier Guards. In order to do this he had to resign from the Buckinghamshire Constabulary. However in 1915 the Police (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act of 1915 came into effect which enabled police officers who volunteered to rejoin their police force at the end of their military engagement. Chief Constables applied the Act retrospectively to officers, such as Raymond, who had resigned in order to join up.

On 20 March 1915 Raymond married Lily Scott in Wandsworth, London (registered Wandsworth 1915 Jan-Mar Volume 1D Page 974).

In July 1915 Raymond’s Battalion was mobilised for war and he landed in France on 26 July 1916. On 7 September 1915 he was promoted Lance Corporal.

On 4 October 1915 Raymond received a gunshot wound to his right foot, which resulted in him being hospitalised initially in a Field Hospital but then he was transferred back to England for recovery.

Raymond was later discharged from a military hospital. However his wound and still not fully healed, and he was unfit to return immediately to military duty. His wife had moved to Cambridge and he joined her there.

On 12 March 1917 Lily gave birth to their son; Raymond John Henry Rickard. The family were living in 8 Tenison Road, Cambridge. Raymond was still unfit to return to military duties and on 2 November 1917 he was discharged from the army as being medically unfit. He was unfit to return to the Buckinghamshire Constabulary, and remained in Cambridge.

Raymond never fully recovered from his injury and in October 1918 his health further deteriorated and on 31 October 1918, aged 25, he died. The cause of death on his death certificate was given as Phthisis Pulmonalis, commonly known as TB. He was buried on 6 November 1918 in All Saints Cemetery, Mill Lane, Cambridge.

Stephen George Beckett was born in Steeple Claydon, Buckinghamshire in 1890.

He was one of seven children of Harry and Elizabeth Beckett. His father was a labourer on the London and North West Railway. In the 1891 Census (Sunday 5 April 1891) Stephen was living with his parents and elder brother, in Church End, Steeple Claydon. By the 1901 Census (Sunday 31 March 1901) the Beckett family have moved to Old End, Padbury, Buckinghamshire. Harry remained working on the railway as a platelayer.

In July 1907 Stephen Beckett enlisted in the army and was posted to the Coldstream Guards, where he served for three years, being discharged on 31 July 1910 and placed on Military Reserve.

On 5 December, 1910 Stephen, aged 21, was appointed Police Constable 62 in the Buckinghamshire Constabulary

In the 1911 Census (Sunday 2 April 1911) Stephen is recorded as a police constable under training living in the Buckinghamshire Constabulary Headquarters in Aylesbury. His father had died, and his mother remained living in 21 Old End Padbury with her three youngest children.

On 17 April, 1911 following initial training Stephen was posted to Chesham. On 28 November 1911 he was moved to Gerrards Cross and on 12 April 1912 he returned to Chesham.

In 1914 military tension was rising in Europe. On 4 August Germany invaded Belgium as a means of accessing and invading France. Due to Germany’s refusal to retreat from the invasion Britain had no option but to declare war on Germany, and The Great War, later also to be referred to as World War One, commenced.

Due to being on Military Reserve Stephen was immediately recalled to the Colours and rejoined 2nd Battalion, Coldsteam Guards.

Between July and September 1915 Stephen married Edith Huckle in Amersham (registered Amersham 1915 Jul-Sep Volume 3A Page 2588). Stephen appears to have met Edith while serving in the police force at Amersham.

On 25 September 1916 Private 730 Stephen Beckett of 2nd Company, 2nd Battalion, Coldstream Guards, was killed in action while fighting in the Battle of Morval, part of the overall Battle of the Somme. He is buried in grave reference IX P 10 and remembered with honour in the Guards’ Cemetery, Lesboeufs, France.

Walter Cecil Gutteridge was born in 1887 in Langley, Buckinghamshire.

He was one of nine children of George and Fanny Gutteridge

In the 1891 Census (Sunday 5 April 1891) the Gutteridge family were living in Stoke Common, Stoke Poges, Buckinghamshire. George was employed as a garden labourer. At this time George and Fanny had seven children, the eldest of which was 15. Walter was four, and had one younger sister.

The family appear not to have moved by the time of the 1901 Census (Sunday 31 March 1901). Walter, then aged 14, was the eldest child still at home, and the two younger children had been born. The youngest was three. George was still employed as a gardener, and Walter was also working as a gardener.

In 1905 Walter, then aged 18, joined the 2nd Battalion of the Oxfordshire Light Infantry where he remained for three years, before being discharged on 7 January 1908 and being placed on Military Reserve.

On 4 January 1909 Walter was appointed Police Constable 158 in the Buckinghamshire Constabulary. After initial training in the Buckinghamshire Constabulary Headquarters at Aylesbury, on 1 February 1909 he was posted to the East Division and stationed at Amersham. He remained there until 6 May 1910 when he was posted to the South West Division and stationed at Bledlow Ridge.

At the time of the 1911 Census (Sunday 2 April 1911) Walter, then aged 24, was the Bledlow Ridge Police Constable, boarding with Mrs Ann Seymour and her daughter Lizzie. His parents; George and Fanny continued to live in Stoke Poges, but had moved to Bells Hill. George was still a gardener.

On 31 July 1911 Walter was posted within the South West Division of the Buckinghamshire Constabulary to Princess Risborough, where he remained until 30 September 1912 when he had another internal divisional posting to the country police area of High Wycombe (High Wycombe Borough had a separate police force until 1947).

On 9 December 1913 Walter had another internal divisional posting to West Wycombe, where he remained until 5 March 1914 when he returned to High Wycombe.

In 1914 military tension was rising in Europe. On 4 August Germany invaded Belgium as a means of accessing and invading France. Due to Germany’s refusal to retreat from the invasion Britain had no option but to declare war on Germany, and The Great War, later also to be referred to as World War One, commenced.

As a result of his previous military service and being on Military Reserve Walter was immediately recalled to the Colours and returned, as Private 7568 W GUTTERIDGE, to what had by then been retiled as the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry.

Walter rose through the ranks and was transferred to the 6th Battalion of the Royal Munster Fusiliers as Sergeant 10719 W Gutteridge.

The 6th Battalion of the Royal Munster Fusiliers were mobilised for war on 9 July 1915 and embarked from Liverpool for Gallipoli, landing at Suvla Bay on 7 August 1915.

On 3 October 1916 while fighting with the Royal Munster Fusiliers, Sergeant Gutteridge died as a result of enemy action. He is remembered with honour and buried in grave reference 111.J.14 in the Struma Military Cemetery, Greece.

William Ewart Gladstone Eaton was born in Woughton on the Green, Buckinghamshire in 1890.

He was one of five children of Frederick and Annie Eaton. In the 1891 Census (Sunday 5 April 1891) the Eton family were living in Chapel Lane, Woughton On The Green, although Frederick who was employed as a steam sawyer was lodging in Penn Street, Penn, Buckinghamshire in order to find work.

In 1892 Annie died at the age of 33. William would have been two years old, and his father Frederick, is left with five children.

By the time of the 1901 Census (Sunday 31 March 1901) William Eaton is recorded as being 12 years old. His father Frederick has married Louisa Swannel. The new Eaton family were living in Chapel Lane, Woughton On The Green, and consist of Frederick’s two younger children, two of Louisa’s children and two children of Frederick and Louisa. Frederick is still employed as a steam sawyer.

In 1905 Louisa Eaton died at the age of 46. William would have been 15 years old, and Frederick is again left on his own with children to bring up. In 1907 he married Nellie Clinch, a widow also with young children.

In the the 1911 Census (Sunday 2 April 1911) the new Eaton family still lived in Woughton On The Green, with Herbert, Frederick’s child with his second wife Louisa, two of Nellie’s children and a daughter of Frederick and Nellie, aged two. All the remaining Eton children, including William, had left home.

William joined the Grenadier Guards in August 1910, and served for three years, being discharged to the Reserves on 29 August 1913.

On 10 September 1913, aged 24, William was appointed police constable 123 in the Buckinghamshire Constabulary. On 27 November 1913 following initial training at the Buckinghamshire Constabulary headquarters in Aylesbury, William was posted to the South Western Division at Marlow.

In 1914 military tension was rising in Europe. On 4 August Germany invaded Belgium as a means of accessing and invading France. Due to Germany’s refusal to retreat from the invasion Britain had no option but to declare war on Germany, and The Great War, later also to be referred to as World War One, commenced.

Due to his previous military service, with the Grenadier Guards, William was recalled to the Colours on 5 August 1914 and returned to the Grenadier Guards as Guardsman 14886 of the 2nd Battalion. The 2nd Battalion was part of the British Expeditionary Force and landed at Le Harve, France on 15 August 1914.

On 1 September 1914 Guardsman 14886 William was killed in action in battles connected with The Retreat from Mons. He has no known grave and is remembered with honour on the La Ferte-Sous-Jouarre Memorial to the Missing in Seine-et-Marne. France.

William North Edwards was born in Chilton, Buckinghamshire, in 1889.

He was the sixth child of Joseph and Ann Edwards. Joseph was an agricultural labourer. In the 1891 Census (Sunday 5 April 1891) the Edwards family were living in Chilton House, Chapel Lane, Buckinghamshire.

Joseph died in 1899 at the age of 43. William was just ten years old. At the time of the 1901 Census (Sunday 31 March 1901) Ann was still living in Chilton Village with four of her children, including William.

At the beginning of 1905 William joined the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry.

In 1907 Ann married John Shipperley, a single man also from the village of Chilton. In the 1911 Census (Sunday 2 April 1911) John and Ann remained living in Chilton village with two of Ann’s children. Both John and the Edward children were working as farm labourers.

In the spring of 1911 William, while still serving in the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, married Emily Jaques. Emily was the daughter of John and Mary Jaques of Chinnor, Oxfordshire. John was the local baker and Emily had been employed within the family business.

William was discharged from the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry in early November 1912, and placed on Military Reserve.

On 14 November 1912 William, aged 25, was appointed Police Constable 197 in the Buckinghamshire Constabulary. At the time of his appointment he was still resident in army accommodation at Cowley Barracks, Oxford.

After initial training at the Buckinghamshire Constabulary Headquarters in Aylesbury William was posted on 8 January 1913, to the Eastern Division and stationed at Amersham.

In 1914 military tension was rising in Europe. On 4 August Germany invaded Belgium as a means of accessing and invading France. Due to Germany’s refusal to retreat from the invasion Britain had no option but to declare war on Germany, and The Great War, later also to be referred to as World War One, commenced.

On 5 August 1914 William, as a Reservist, was recalled to the Colours and rejoined the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry.

On 28 July 1915 Sergeant 8159 William, of 5th Battalion Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry was killed in action. William has no known grave and is remembered with honour on Panel 37 of Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, in Leper, West Vlaanderen, Belgium.

William George Tilbury was born in Headington, Oxford in 1886.

He was one of four children of George and Louisa Tilbury. In the 1891 Census (Sunday 5 April 1891) they are recorded as living in Pound, Headington, Old Headington, Oxford. His father was a general labour.

Between the 1891 and 1901 Census (Sunday 31 March 1901) something happened to break up the family, as no trace could be found of the family as a whole. In 1901 William was 15 years old and recorded as working as a servant for William Somerville at The Black Boy, High Street, Headington. His sister; Sarah was recorded as living in an orphanage in Bedford.

By the 1911 Census (Sunday 2 April 1911) William had joined the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry and was a Lance Corporal in the 1st Battalion, based in Wellington Barracks, Nilgiris, India.

On 1 December 1913 William was discharged from the Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry and placed on Reserve. On 16 February 1914 at the age of 28, he was appointed Police Constable 205 in the Buckinghamshire Constabulary and after initial training at the headquarters in Aylesbury was posted to the Eastern Division and stationed at Beaconsfield.

Between April and June 1914 William married Lillian Mary Newton in Thame (registered Thames, Oxfordshire 1914 Apr – June Volume 3A Page 2192).

In 1914 military tension was rising in Europe. On 4 August Germany invaded Belgium as a means of accessing and invading France. Due to Germany’s refusal to retreat from the invasion Britain had no option but to declare war on Germany, and The Great War, later also to be referred to as World War One, commenced.

On 4 August 1914 England declared war on Germany, and as a result of being on Reserve William was recalled to the Colours on 5 August, 1914 and became part of the 5th Battalion of the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, which was initially formed at Oxford.

Between January and March 1915 Lillian gave birth to their son, also named William George (registered Amersham Buckinghamshire 1915 Jan-March Volume 3a Page 1820).

On 15 October 1915 Sergeant 7776 William Tilbury, aged 30, was killed In action. He has no known grave and is commemorated on panel 39 of the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial in Belgium.

Information on this page found and verified from researching archived police records and newspapers plus from entries on the following websites: Find My Past, Ancestry, Commonwealth War Graves Commission, Forces-war-records.